Part 8: You as the Movie Editor and More: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

March 16th, 2012

file0001311160630You as the Editor

The film editor is the person who assembles the various shots into a coherent film, with the help of the director. There is no one way to edit because editing is like art: it is a creative process.  The one characteristic of editing, though, is to make sure your shot sequences are cohesive. In other words, people who are watching your video must “get it”.

To help you edit, take good notes when video recording so you can tell which takes are best during the editing process.

There are several editing programs you can choose from.  Windows Movie Maker is a free program already installed in your PC if you use the Windows platform.  I Movie, also a free program, is installed in your Mac if you operate on the Apple platform.  Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro are two other excellent video editing programs.

You as the Music Editor

The music supervisor, or “music director”, works with the composer, mixers and editors to create and integrate the film’s music.  Music is to video like good interior design is to a room.

There are many free music production libraries available as well as low cost production music.  There are also pay as you go licensing music libraries like Omni Music.  Apple Final Cut Pro video editing software comes with a full production music library. Production Trax is another excellent music library.

Use music to set the mood of your video.  Music also adds an element of production value.  It could set you apart from your competition.

You as the Distributor

A film distributor is a company or individual responsible for releasing films to the public, either theatrically or for home viewing (DVD, VideoOnDemand, Download, andTelevision etc.). A distributor may do this directly or through theatrical exhibitors and other sub-distributors.

There are over 30 video content delivery networks available for FREE on the Internet to help promote your video.  Plus, you can add links back to your website from these networks to your website to help with search engine rankings.

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her at Lauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

Part 7: You as the Vocal Coach: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

March 14th, 2012

You as the Vocal Coach

The vocal coach can identify vocal difficulties that might be keeping the actor from best achieving the director’s vision. The vocal coach can also provide an analysis of why these problems may be occurring and give strategies to the director to address them in the rehearsal situation if desired. 14745063379_6f1e8fdf80_nThe coach can create a program of specific vocal exercises for the actor to release or expand the voice to better fulfill the director’s vision. The coach can present a company vocal warm-up or an individualized actor warm-up. The coach can distribute basic vocal hygiene guidelines, if needed.

A vocal coache corrects habitual speech patterns: mumbling, whispering, adding extraneous sounds, stressing too many words, stressing inoperative words, dropping ends of words or sentences, or other speaking habits which are in the way of clear expression.

A vocal coach also helps actors overcome vocal stress, strain or damage, which can result in extreme hoarseness or roughness, inability to perform at previous levels, or loss of voice.

What this means to you:

  • Know the importance of warming up your voice
  • Learn how to warm up your voice
  • Learn how to protect your voice
  • Know what to drink and what not to drink
  • Add interest to your voice
  • Add power to your voice
  • Sound credible
  • Sound approachable
  • Have resonance in your voice
  • Add tone to your voice
  • Breathe properly

http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/view_photog.php?photogid=2280

Adapted from “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her at Lauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

photo credit: Studio Microphone via photopin (license)

Part 6: You as the Lighting and Sound: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

March 9th, 2012

file000676603076You as the Lighting Technician

Lighting and sound both play a part in quality video production. Lighting technicians are responsible for the movement and set up of various pieces of lighting equipment for visualeffects. Lighting Technicians may also lay electrical cables, wire fixtures, install color effects or image patterns, focus the lights, and assist in creating effects or programming sequences.

Lighting is very important to video, especially if you are using green screen technology.

Fluorescent lighting strobes when lit, which conflicts with the shutter on your video. It is also the wrong color of white, so it may make you look older on video that you are.

When lighting with incandescent lights, spread the lights far apart and and as close to you as possible without getting in the shot. That way any shadows that are created will be outside the frame.

You as the Sound Engineer

The production sound mixer is head of the sound department on set, responsible for recording all sound during filming. This involves the choice and deployment of microphones, operation of a sound recording device, and sometimes the mixing of audio signals in real time.

What this means to you:

  • Do you need a mic?
  • How important is sound quality?
  • Is your location noisy?

○     Beware of noise (animals, phones, traffic, people)

○     Beware of ambient sound (refrigerators, furnace, air conditioning, lights)

  • What are the different types of mics?

○     Lavalier

○        Boom

○        Hand held

○        Desktop

○        Computer

  • Which mic is right for you?

○     Use

○        Sound Quality

○        Price

  • Learn how to place the mic
  • Learn how to wear a lavalier mic
  • Learn how to create recordings that can be synched with b roll

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her atLauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

Part 5: You as the Director of Photography: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

March 7th, 2012

file000247788530The Director of Photography (DOP, also known as a Cinematographer) works with the Director and the Production Designer to achieve the cinematic “look” of the film.  This involves choosing the type of film stock to use and the type of camera and the lighting style to complement and enhance the way the Director and Production Designer wish the movie to look.

What kind of camera will you be using for your video?  Who will operate the camera if you will be the actor?  Will you be operating the camera while another person from your team is the actor?

Initially the DOP works with the Director to plan and storyboard the way scenes are shot, and once filming has commenced, works with the camera team(s) and the lighting team to decide on camera and light placement.

Lighting is another consideration.  How do you want the scene to look?  Are you using multiple scenes?  If so, make sure there is continuity from scene to scene with both camera angles and lighting as well as sound quality and volume levels.

The director is probably the most important person in any video recording.

What this means to you is that you have to purchase a camera if you do not already own one.  There are places that you can rent video cameras from if you are not sure that you want to buy a camera.  You probably also have friends who own video cameras who might loan one to you.

You also have some decisions to make. What will the background of your video look like?  How will your lighting be implemented? What color of outfit will you wear to compliment the background of your video?

  • Become familiar with your camera
  • Determine the background for your video
  • How will the lighting help the background and subject in your video?
  • Do the wardrobe colors compliment the background?

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her atLauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

How To: Make Your Windows 7 Machine Run Faster!

March 5th, 2012

Windows 7 PC Tuneup Quick Tips

There are many different techniques to keeping a windows computer happy and healthy. Today we will discuss just a few simple tips to get your Windows 7 machine operating at top notch!

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Primeau Productions Recommended Software:

(Beginner Skill Level)

  • CCleaner is the BEST spyware and registry cleaner that Primeau Productions uses on a daily basis. It goes deeper than cleaning out internet cookies moving files around to save on space. It goes deeper to find problems within your registry and make your software programs communicate to your machine better. Not to mention it’s completely FREE!
  • AVG Anti-Virus is FREE and it works! No need to manually scan or update your anti-virus software anymore. AVG makes it simple to stop malicious scripts  from tearing your windows 7 machine to bits. It not only quarantines threats it comes into contact with, but also locks them in a virus vault for future removal and information on how it got into your system, and where it came from.

 

Quick Tip’s for Increasing PC Speed in Windows 7

(Moderate Skill Level; If you don’t feel comfortable digging this deep into your OS then we recommend to stay away from these tips)

  1. Disable SuperPrefetch – First we want to launch regedit from the start menu. Then navigate to this location in your registry: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE System CurrentControlSet Control Session Manager Memory Management Prefetch Parameters. Next you will want to modify the Enable Super Fetch value from 3 to 0. This will communicate to the program to stay dormant. (You should notice a dramatic increase in speed from this step)
  2. Windows Features – Navigate to your Start Menu, and in the search box type “Windows Features”. We recommend to disable the games folder if you aren’t an avid gamer in the simple games Windows 7 has to offer. Next under Microsoft .NET Framework, you will want to check both boxes under that drop down menu. And finally, you will want to un-check the Tablet PC folder which will turn off tablet features for your desktop or laptop machine. Following that click OK, but DO NOT RESTART. There are further steps to finish before a restart is necessary.
  3. Clear Temporary APP Data – Navigate to the start menu again, and type “RUN” into the search box and click OK. In the RUN window, enter “%temp%”. Then delete all files within this folder. Skip the files that cannot be deleted.
  4. Prefetch Data – Navigate to the start menu,  and enter “RUN” into the search box once more, and type “Prefetch” and click OK. Windows may ask the million dollar question of “Are you sure you want to see these files?”. Continue anyway.  Delete all files within this directory.
  5. REBOOT – Now comes the time for a system reboot.

And Your Done! 

Video Sample for More Help:

Credit for this information goes out to  YouTube user : EngageTutorials

photo credit: install now via photopin (license)

Part 4: You As the Director: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

March 2nd, 2012

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can take cues from the Hollywood Pros to create better video for your business. Thinking like a Hollywood director is one way to increase your SEO, win clients, and set yourself apart from the competition.

You as the Director

The director is responsible for overseeing the creative aspects of a film, including controlling the content and flow of the film’s plot, directing the performances of actors, organizing and selecting the locations in which the film will be shot, and managing technical details such as the positioning of cameras, the use of lighting, and the timing and content of the film’s soundtrack.

Some directors, especially more established ones, take on many of the roles of a producer, and the distinction between the two roles is sometimes blurred.

What this means to you is that you have to take charge of your video from concept to completion. As director you will be responsible for the look and feel of your video from video recording locations (don’t forget green screen video recording) to music to the words spoken and text graphics on the screen. Make sure your message is clear and concise as you complete your video.

As director you are also responsible for building your production team. Pick the people from your staff or subcontractors who fit in your budget and can deliver what your video needs to look and feel professional.

You are also responsible for organization of your video during preproduction and during the video recording process.  As director, you are the boss on the set and during the recording process. You are the person responsible to “directing” the talent and crew to deliver your message as originally envisioned in your mind’s eye.

As director, you are like the conductor of an orchestra. You help the talent that has been selected to play their instruments in unison and deliver a beautiful piece of music to your audience.

As director, you also keep the video recording process organized. At the beginning of each “take” you slate the take “take one” and then keep notes about what you like about the take.  If you are the actor in your video, then you need to explain these processes to whoever you assign the director role.

Before beginning the recording process of each scene, you will want to determine where the camera should be positioned. Try different angles and view from your video monitor before committing to a set look for that scene.

  • Take charge of your video
  • Make sure your message is clear and concise
  • Pick music
  • Organize and direct talent and crew
  • Create the look and feel of your video

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her atLauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

Part 3: You As the Location Scout and More: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

February 29th, 2012

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can take cues from the Hollywood Pros to create better video for your business. Thinking like a Hollywood director is one way to increase your SEO, win clients, and set yourself apart from the competition. The following tips were written by Laurie Brown.

You as the Location Scout
Once scriptwriters, producers or directors have decided what general kind of scenery they require for the various parts of their work shot outside of the studio, the search for a suitable place or “location” outside the studio begins.

What this means to you is that you need to find the perfect location(s) for your video. Your background will add to the brand image of you, your product and services.

● What location(s) can you use?
● Is it noisy?
● Is there natural light?
● What else is in the shot?
● Do you need to get permission?

You as the Prop Master
During pre-production Property Masters liaise with production designers and art directors to break down the script and to determine what props are required. At this stage Property Masters may work with production buyers who carry out research into period props, styles of furniture, etc., by referring to archives, internet files, books and photographs, or by discussing the requirements with specialized advisors. Property Masters subsequently draw up complete properties lists, and set up and label the properties tables, which are used during production. From the lists, Property Masters select which properties are to be bought in, or hired, and which are to be made.

● Will you use any props?
● What props are essential?

You as the Set Dresser
The set decorator is in charge of the decorating of a film set, which includes the furnishings and all the other objects that will be seen in the film. They work closely with the production designer and coordinates with the art director

You as the Actor
A movie actor portrays different characters in films. His role may require him to be humorous, serious or a combination of the two. His ability to play a wide range of parts generally increases his success in the industry. The roles he plays may be large or small, shot in a studio or require him to travel to remote locations.

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her atLauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

Part 2: You as the Script Writer: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

February 24th, 2012

9165096158_a898527c5b_nYou as the Script Writer

The script writer develops a story idea with believable, interesting characters and lays out the plan on paper for the production team.

In this initial phase the writer fixates on a compelling idea and begins the “What if…” game. Characters are developed with back stories to flesh them out, and the idea grows into a causal storyline with a beginning, middle and end that includes the major plot points of each act. At the end of this process the screenwriter should know each character as well as a best friend, able to quickly predict how the character would react in any situation. The genre and theme should be clear, the story, solid.

Create the video in your mind’s eye first then commit it to paper in a story board style for easy communication to your production team. Write out the wording or copy points even if not perfect so everyone understands your vision.

What this means to you is that you have to come up with the script for your video before you begin the production process.  Spend some time before you begin jotting down ideas.  It’s amazing how putting pen to paper helps the creative process.

Make a list of the topics you can write a script about; what are you a subject matter expert on? How does your talent, skills and ability translate to a valuable script idea and video?

Remember that you can make revisions to your script so you don’t have to be perfect on the first draft.  Show your script to a mentor or employee and get their opinion and feedback.  Two heads are better than one.

  • You need to write a script
  • Who is your audience?
  • What do they need to know about your topic?
  • How will you format your message?
  • Make a list of topics to elaborate on
  • You can always revise your script before recording any video

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her atLauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

photo credit: Cracking Animation via photopin (license)

Part 1: You as the Producer: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

February 22nd, 2012

Calgary Corporate Video Production CompanyYou as the Producer

A movie producer oversees all aspects of the movie production and delivers a film project to all relevant parties while preserving the integrity, voice and vision of the film. They will also often take on some financial risk by using their own money and investing more time than being compensated for, especially before a film is fully financed  during the pre-production period.

The producer is often actively involved throughout all major phases of the film-making process, from inception and development through to completion and delivery of a film project.

What this means to you is that you have to learn how to think like a producer when creating video content for your business.  Who do you need to be on your video production team? Your employees know your business better than anyone else so utilize their talent, skill and ability. Keep in mind what your prospects and customers need to know about your business, products and services.

Create a budget for your equipment purchase or professional assistance as well as your investment of time and stick to it.  Create databases for your production team that include contact information of professional service suppliers, equipment vendors and other resources for easy access.

As you build your Internet marketing campaign, you will also need a database of all your contacts, prospects and social media account sign in information, including passwords.

You are the boss of your video production and as the producer you have to be the architect of your video from beginning to end.

  • Learn how to think like a producer
  • Who will be on your production team?
  • Create a budget
  • Manage your database of contacts, prospects and social media outlets

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her atLauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

Learn How to Say No – Stress Free Living

February 7th, 2012

IMG_6830Stress free living: it may be hard at first, but with time your guilt will diminish.

One of the biggest problems we are all faced with every week is saying yes when we really want to say no. Saying yes when we really want to say no causes unnecessary stress.

In business, we say yes to our clients in order to make them happy and provide great service.  Many of those yes’s should have been no’s and we would have served our clients better.

In our personal lives, we say yes when we really should say no to avoid guilt. Last week a friend asked me to help him design a website and marketing campaign for his bar in Detroit Michigan. I said yes because he is a great friend and truly needed our expertise. That yes will turn into work for us because he has a very historic high profile business in the heart of downtown Detroit.  That yes will be stress free because we can take our time with the activity and complete the project on our terms.

Often when people ask us to go out of our way they are thinking of themselves and not those they ask for help. If we all learned to say no at least some of the time, we would have less stress in our lives.

By saying yes too often, we add activity to our already busy lives. Think about the last time you reluctantly said yes and really wanted to say no. How much time would you have back in your life if you would have said no?

Saying yes when we really want to say no is very stressful. It’s not that people want to stress us out, but rather that so many need our help.  One of the greatest character traits of a leader is to delegate. When people ask for our help they are really trying to delegate some of their activity to us. The secret to living a happier and healthier life is to learn to say no more often. Think about the number of hours we could all get back into our lives if we said no just some of the time.

Next time somebody asks you to help them and you don’t want to, think of the language you can use to say no. Try these lines:

“I would really like to help you, but I am out of time this week.”

“If you saw my schedule this week you would know what I have to decline your request.”

How about this: “No.”

You do not have to be mean saying no. Keep your eye on the prize: the ability to keep your stress level down and have more time back in your life.

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