The Future of The Video Experience – Part III: 4k

screenMany people strive for the best quality in their media. We see this in how people consume media today. Think back: When was the last time you paused or refreshed a video on YouTube because it wouldn’t stream at full 1080p? What about the last time you chose to buy a ticket to the IMAX showing of a movie instead of a regular theater because you “just had to see it in IMAX?” We like our video to be high quality, and as long as that’s the case,
we’ll always strive to increase the quality of our media.

With that said, there are people pushing the boundaries of how high they can truly go in regards to quality. This is where 4k technology comes into play. Though we’ve reached this next step in video quality, how long will this technology be relevant? What could it do to change the industry?

First, let’s get down to the basics about 4k.

What is it?

To put it simply, 4k is a higher video quality than that of 1080p. The entire purpose of 4k is to utilize more pixels to create a higher quality image. Higher pixel count means more detail, which, in turn, creates a more vivid and clear image for the viewer.

What does it do?

In a nutshell, 4k is just defined as more pixels. To understand this, you need a relative understanding of how modern televisions work.

A pixel, as we’ve covered in recent blog posts, is a square image of light and color that works with others to create a full picture. In the past, we have described a pixel as one of the small photos that make up a collage. All of the smaller pictures work together to forge a bigger image. Television works the same way, at a much higher and faster rate.

 

A 1080p display means that there it is 1080 rows of pixels tall, and 1920 columns of pixels wide. With 4k, you’re talking 4,000 pixels wide, and 2160 tall. Let’s go back to the collage analogy. The more pictures you use to create the bigger image, the higher quality the bigger image will turn out. The same applies to television. As opposed to 3,000 miniature pictures, you now have 6,160 images making up the bigger picture. That’s over double the pixels!

What could it do?

To say the least, 4k is around to stay.

If this technology sticks around, we can expect a major change in the way cinematography is approached in the future. Filmmakers are already shooting films in 4k. Many models of GoPros even have 4k capabilities. Even some cell phones, such as the Samsung Galaxy Note 3, are able to achieve 4k quality!

4k and higher technologies could change the way we approach cinematography. As more pixels result in a more lush and detailed image, and with our obsession with high quality media, it’s safe to say that 4k could easily become the new standard.

Where is it at in development?

4k is already commercially available. You can purchase a 4k TV at almost any electronics store or even online these days. You can even purchase cinema cameras now that go up to 5k and 6k, such as the Sony RED, but they come with a hefty price tag. Video quality technology will always be changing and developing, so who knows how high developers will go before we reach a new standard.

Example:

Below, you’ll find a comparison between footage taken in 4k compared to footage taken in full HD (or 1080p). Can you tell the difference?

Stay tuned for more from “The Future of the Video Experience,” right here at PrimeauProductions.com

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