Package and Position Your Product for Higher Sales

169099963_97a758887e_nPackages come in all shapes and sizes. Various factors will determine which package option is best for you. Quantity, perceived-value, and the nature of your program all factor into your decision. Since some of the high-end packages require a minimum run of 2,500 pieces, you need to carefully explore all of your options. A good production company can steer you in the right direction for the appropriate package option to suit your needs.

Design a package that lives up to your name.

No matter how good your production is, remember, people do judge a book by its cover. Don’t shortchange your great product with a poor package design.

Conceptualize what you want the outside of your product to look like. Draw it out as best you can and list all the titles, by-lines and credits. Be sure to put your bio on the outside, if it’s appropriate. Then find a great graphic designer to bring it all together. Take a look at other products that are similar to yours, and pick the ones you like to help you design your own.

Don’t scrimp on design.

Spend the time and the money to create beautiful cover art and packaging. It should look professional and eye-catching. Show the graphic artist packaging you find stunning to give them an idea of what you want. What colors suit the mood you wish to create with your product? Make a mock-up by cutting out images from a magazine and rubber-cementing them to a piece of paper to help communicate your ideas to a graphic designer (preferably someone who was highly recommended to you). Let the designer hear or view your finished or rough-mixed production and let them interpret the cover design.

Always decide on the type of package case (CD album, video box, etc.) before designing the cover art, to give the artist a sense of space and dimension. Be careful not to crowd the cover design with a lot of text, which creates confusion and anxiety. The cover should jump out at you. Choose color combinations carefully. Consider what’s in style currently. Or you may choose to stay neutral to increase the longevity of the product.

Make it easy to reference.
I call it reference-ability. Each CD or CD track should cover one subject or category. Make each CD a subject or category of mini-subjects that pertain to the main category so people can easily access the information they want — this is a great benefit and makes the program/series user-friendly.

CDs hold up to eighty minutes of recorded information, while single-sided DVDs hold up to two hours of video. Stay tuned for the latest update on playback technology. It looks like it will be Internet downloading.

Package it for greatest marketability and profit.
What if you had three hours of message or program to sell? Would you put it on two or three CDs? Or, would it have a higher perceived-value if it were on or six CDs? Which scenario would earn you more income? Which scenario would have the higher perceived-value? Which would be more user-friendly?

Interested in learning more about professional media services like audio/video? Contact me at 800-647-4281.

This information is taken from my book The Art of Production, which you can purchase from Amazon or you can purchase an e-book version from SmashWords.

photo credit: ART INSIDE via photopin (license)

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