How To Format and Export HD Video for Web Use & Internet Marketing – Mike Primeau – Adobe Premiere Pro

When it comes to exporting HD video there are always way too many options to choose from. Formatting this video for your proper application can also be tricky. Whether you are editing on a windows machine or an apple machine, the format library looks the same. Do I pick an H264 codec? What about a WMV? But my editor’s friend told me that MOV is the way to go. What frame rate do I choose for my sequence? What frame rate do I choose for the best use of internet? These are all VERY common questions.  From progressive scans to interlaced footage, this whole “video editing thing” can sometimes feel like brain surgery. Sure I don’t know what brain surgery looks like but you get the idea. For internet use of video, editors and video producers alike. Here at Primeau Productions we use a combination of Final Cut Pro and Premiere Pro to edit our video.5873696629_9da63d29e6_n

There are three main types of formatting that Primeau Production’s editors use for Internet Video sites such as Vimeo or YouTube.

  • H264 Formatting
  • WMV Formatting
  • MOV Formatting

Compressing video can always be confusing, but here’s a few quick tips that can be your saving grace when setting up your editing sequence, and exporting your video masterpiece.

1. Always set up your sequence settings to match your source footage. You can set up a higher resolution sequence with lower resolution video, but the footage appears to be stretched and blurred in this way. It’s the same principle of blowing up a wallet sized photo that wasn’t done properly. You can change the pixel size of some footage to work with a higher resolution sequence but it’s always better to stick with the formatting of the original footage.

2. Match your Frame Rate. Whether it be anamorphic, progressive, or interlaced, you always have to match the frame rate of your source footage to the sequence or you will have strobe city in your video. Stick with 30FPS with internet video. 24F or even 25F is barley shot anymore and you only see this type of footage in movies, and documentaries. If you shoot with a higher end camera such as Primeau Production’s choice(Cannon XF-300) then there are a variety of different ways to capture your HD footage. Shoot in an interlaced form. 60I to be exact. Once you bring this footage into the machine, picking your sequence will be a-lot easier with the interlaced tracking, and motion will also look smoother. Almost all sporting events are shot with an interlaced Frame Rate to capture every frame of action.

3. Stick to the main format’s of video. In these times, sites like YouTube and Vimeo automatically format and convert your video to work with their website formatting for smooth playback and buffering speeds. Don’t export an uncompressed piece of video or a Microsoft AVI format. Those types of video are dead. Online video is the new Video Revolution.

4. Match Match Match. We cannot stress this enough. It’s like building a car. If you took a bumper off of a 2010 BMW and glued it to a 1996 Ford T-Bird, it just plain and simple won’t look right. Keep your Frame Rate fluent throughout your project. Keep your resolution fluent throughout your project. And most importantly, keep your format fluent throughout your project.

There are many resources at your disposal for formatting video, HD video, and Internet video. The most important in our opinion is video itself. Instructional videos are becoming more and more popular. When you don’t know the answer, do some research. Google it! And when all else fails and you need a professional to produce your next video, give us a call! Primeau Productions has been producing professional videos for over 30 years. When it comes to mixing formats and getting your video viral, we WILL make it happen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mike Primeau

1-800-647-4281

Senior Editor-Premiere Pro CS4

Mike@PrimeauProductions.com

Keep up with the Video Revolution!

http://www.thevideorevolutiononline.com

photo credit: The Destruction of Final Cut Studio via photopin (license)

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