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Archive for the ‘Marketing’ Category

Apple Feels The Guilt from “Songs of Innocence”

Monday, October 6th, 2014

9243849984_e55bc33e62Along with the announcement of the iPhone 6 came another announcement that Apple thought would excite its customers, when in fact, it did exactly the opposite.

Apple released the new U2 album, “Songs of Innocence,” for free to all iTunes and iPhone users.

In theory, this is a great idea! It’s a win-win situation for everyone involved! Apple wins by tacking its sales onto a profitable source of human entertainment. U2 wins because, well, money, and the consumers win because they get a new U2 album absolutely free of charge (not to mention legal, considering the pirating landscape of the Internet now).

Sounds great, right? Look at how well it turned out for Jay-Z and Samsung! The phone company partnered with businessman/rapper Shawn Carter, AKA Jay-Z, with the release of their Galaxy 6 phone. The deal basically stated that Samsung would offer one million Samsung users the opportunity to download the album for free to their Samsung smartphone.

This technique is similar to what Tom Petty recently took on with his new album, Hypnotic Eye, and it seemed to work really well for him! So what went wrong with U2 and Apple?

The key difference between this tactic and U2’s route can be defined in one word: offered.

In Tom Petty’s case, the consumer could choose to not opt in, as opposed to requiring you to opt out.  Apple’s big mistake with this project is that the sense of opting in was not an option. Holding an Apple account automatically opts you in to get the album. On a certain level, this is more of an issue of digital privacy than content of music (not to say that’s not a factor either, but I’ll get back to that later).

Digital privacy is a huge controversy. This action of offering a free album and giving it to all iTunes users made some users angry. You could argue that iTunes is Apple’s jurisdiction and they did nothing wrong. iTunes is completely run by Apple, and the iTunes store is their domain to do what they please with. However, the issue arises when Apple has the ability to modify the digital contents of your personal phone.

The notification within the phone indicated that you have the opportunity to download the album from your Cloud. Apple put the album in the user’s Cloud storage. However, with the controversy regarding privacy within the Cloud, including the leaking of naked photos from hacked celebrity iCloud accounts back in August, to the controversial security potential of Apple Pay, a breach of digital “privacy” like this only scares consumers more.

This issue flared up to the point that Apple has created a mini-site dedicated to removing the U2 album. iPhone users were calling Apple support nonstop trying to figure out how to get this U2 album off of their phone. Even though it was free to them, they didn’t want it.

This came as a surprise to Apple. With a technique so apt to go viral and the beautiful promotional videos that came along with it as TV advertising, they thought it would be a smash hit. Obviously, their theory did not correspond to their execution.

This begs the question: What about U2 made users so angry to have this free album on their phone? Why not just listen to it and move on? Had a more relevant or popular artist (Frank Ocean, for example, whose highly anticipated follow-up to his debut Channel Orange is expected this year) released a free album for us to enjoy, would users be so angry?

Over the past few years amongst social sites online, such as Reddit, a trend of hate has occurred amongst certain artists. This is the reason for Nickelback’s universal disdain on the internet. This is the reason why “The Big Bang Theory” is one of the most detested television shows shows amongst the social web. There’s a trend on the Internet to hate, and unfortunately, Bono is one of those targets.

Not to mention that a big demographic of iPhone users would not even be slightly familiar with U2 and other artists of that generation. The millennials aren’t learning about older forms of rock like they used to, and it’s a risky demographic decision considering the audience of iPhone users.

Fortunately, this does not harm Bono in any way. This album, regardless of what people think of it, will go platinum. Why? Let’s go back to Jay-Z. Jay’s album, Magna Carta Holy Grail, went platinum before it even came out. This is because to offer a free album to the 213,000+ that hold Samsung Galaxy phones, they’d have to buy well over the amount of copies it takes to go platinum. The same applies to U2. This album is platinum status regardless of the outrage.

There’s no definite reason this all happened. Maybe it’s due to privacy issues. Maybe they’re marketing to a generation who isn’t familiar enough with Bono to understand why his album is suddenly next to the new Pharrell album in their phone. I think the true issue is that no one asked for this. Having the album forced upon us like this is naturally going to cause opposition, and I personally think U2 was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

photo credit: In His World via photopin (license)

What Potato Salad Can Teach Us About Viral Marketing

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

By: Brad Finegan

11191901735_21a3c8d20bKickstarter is a great way for startups to raise some quick cash and generate interest in their ideas. It’s a community of believers, where no new idea is too far out. And with the power of that community, any dream can be realized. But, as of last week, it’s been undeniably proven that literally anything can be accomplished with the right community.

Even making potato salad.

Don’t worry – your eyes are fine. You read right: a man put up a Kickstarter page in hopes of raising money to make, (wait for it), potato salad. The Kickstarter page, posted by Denison University grad Zack Brown, had a pledged goal of $10, just enough to buy all of the ingredients to make a good potato salad. Not surprisingly, he accomplished his goal. Surprisingly, the Kickstarter campaign still has 22 days left, and as of right now, he’s made over $44,000.

That’s right, $44,000. Enough to make over 4000 potato salads. Hell, you could probably buy a modest Idaho potato farm with $44,000! Either way, this kid made a lot of money trying to raise funds for something as basic and uninteresting as potato salad.

When I brought the idea of the blog post you’re now reading to Primeau Productions founder Ed Primeau (AKA, my boss), we were baffled. We both knew that there was some sort of lesson here; that this guy had to have some sort of golden key to viral marketing. After a short and mutually confusing discussion about this, Ed told me, “I like it. Go ahead and write it.”

So here I am, writing this blog post, and even now, as I’m sitting comfortably at my desk on this gorgeous day in July, brainstorming about what it is that this miraculous endeavor is trying to teach us, frankly, I’m finding myself at a loss. Maybe it’s a lesson in simplicity in marketing? Maybe the power of dry humor in advertising? Maybe the ability to tap into a clandestine network of … potato salad enthusiasts?

Whatever the lesson, the fact still remains: a guy got over 5,000 people to back his cause to create Potato Salad (something Brown admits he’s never even made before). What’s the secret? At the end of the day, I don’t think he had a secret. There was no extensive marketing scheme, there was no hilarious video to entertain you enough to donate a few bucks, and there was no true initiative at all for anyone to contribute to this, let alone contribute to its own viral tornado.

I think what content creators should really take away from this is: the Internet is a bottomless chasm of mystery and unpredictability. The combined power of the Internet community has done things that the general population wouldn’t have ever imagined, even if that’s contributing almost $50,000 to a hungry college grad trying to make some potato salad.

Companies can use as much data, statistics, and planning as they want to, but the truth of the situation is that viral marketing does not work in a straight line. No one can ever truly predict what will and will not go viral, and we should all just learn to accept that. Once we accept that the Internet is a living, breathing organism with a mind of it’s own, we can understand that anything (even something as simple as potato salad) can become a hit amongst thousands and change the history of the Internet forever.

Some might see the absurdity of this story as discouraging, but I personally find it inspiring. I think something this unanticipated, this inexplicable, proves that any of us have the opportunity to launch a successful viral marketing campaign. But that is not for us to decide. It’s up to the community.

photo credit: Francuska salata via photopin (license)

The War Between Your Content and Your Consumers

Monday, June 9th, 2014

3981669264_8c3bec3db4As a Video Content Creator What Do You Need To Know About Your Consumer’s Viewing Habits?

Until 2007, cable was king. No one was providing entertainment quite like cable did. But something happened that changed all of that and this something has an impact on your company marketing.

The Impact of Netflix on Internet Video Viewing

Netflix changed the way viewers interact with their content.  This didn’t only change how we digest television content, but how we digest any Internet video content. Successful companies know that as video content marketers, they should become aware of these new consumption habits, and learn how to apply them to our own Internet video marketing strategy.

Take for example, the successful network FX. FX has created some very successful shows like It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, American Horror Story, Wilfred and Louie. The programming of that station was a hit, and considering that every program they aired generally went to Netflix and other On Demand services, the network exponentially gained popularity over the past 5 years.

Now, FX is a station that generally comes with your standard cable package. Due to its accessibility and the resulting popularity, FX became one of the only stations left where viewers actually tuned into their shows at the time during which they aired.

 

Last year, FX announced that some of their programming would migrate to a new station, FXX. Part of the reason for this decision was that their more vulgar programming could be aired with less censoring, but that privilege came with a price. FXX does not come with your basic cable programming. It is extra.

Similar to HBO, consumers would have to pay extra to access this content. Since some of it was too raunchy to be aired on basic cable, they figured that having another network with less censoring would provide FX more opportunities for publicity and programming.

Unfortunately, our digital generation did not like the idea of paying more. Hell, we don’t even want to pay for cable anymore. Since then, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia’s ratings have dropped substantially. Prior to this change, It’s Always Sunny was one of the highest rated comedies in history, and going in to its 10th season with two more seasons confirmed, the show is on its way to being the longest running comedy in history. So why did the ratings drop so drastically?

Because no one was watching.

No one wants to pay for FXX. As a consumer, this programming is inaccessible because we don’t want to front the extra cash for programming. Though FXX had a great idea, its execution is flawed for this generation. Had FX done this back when HBO went premiere, they may have made millions. The fact of the matter is we don’t want to pay for more TV. We don’t even want to pay for the TV we have.

We’re becoming a part of a culture where we like to binge our media. We don’t want commercials; we don’t want to sit on a cliffhanger until next week. We want to sit and watch a show as if it were a movie; uninterrupted.

This, obviously, can be attributed to all the streaming technology available today. We have the ability to binge watch shows without ads for $7 a month and we want to do that more than anything.

Companies have many lessons to learn from this business model. As content marketers, you have valuable information to share that will help ease your prospect’s pain. Your prospective viewers want to binge consume your valuable information therefore you should make sure your potential viewers are able to do this.

Content is Still King

Companies possess a body of work; information that can be shared through Internet video programming for prospective viewers. Produce multiple videos for content on your company’s YouTube or Vimeo Channels. Create playlists so viewers can easily view the videos in their necessary progression. Keeping a consistent flow of video content will keep prospective viewers watching more frequently.

Along those same lines, content marketers should remember why so many viewers turned to Netflix: it’s cheap. Unless the consumer has some serious incentive to purchase something, they won’t. With Netflix, the incentive is endless streaming media.

For your online content, generally, free is your best price. Allow your prospect viewers to check out your content whenever they want with no restrictions.

Companies need to become content marketers and create video content on a regular basis. As video is becoming the most valuable source of content, companies who market it should always remain aware of their audience’s relationship with your information.  Content is king but consumption is important to opening the door on the sale.

photo credit: netflix via photopin (license)

The Video Experience: Experiential Product Marketing

Friday, May 9th, 2014

7581040322_323cd9836cWe’ve been discussing “The Video Experience,” whereas every piece of video content that you market online should create an experience for the viewer and the audience that you’re aiming for. This lesson not only applies to video, but can be applied to product marketing as well.

On Saturday, April 19th, an event was held that has become a holiday for music enthusiasts everywhere: Record Store Day.

Record Store Day is an event that takes place every spring at record shops across the globe. It’s purpose is to celebrate music culture, support local record shops, and, arguably most importantly, the importance of the physical music medium, especially vinyl records.

You might be thinking “Who still buys vinyl records?” The answer might surprise you. Sales on vinyl records are tallied every year during record store day weekend, and vinyl record sales in 2012 were higher than they’ve been in over 20 years. Even in the world of digital music we live in, vinyl records and their collectors have created a culture all their own over the past decade, not only due to collectors’ enthusiasm, but also due to the ever-expanding sampling culture of modern hip-hop and electronic beat music.

The resurgence of vinyl records is confusing to some, but if you take the time to really analyze why vinyl records have become so popular amongst music advocates, you’ll learn that a big portion has to do with experiential marketing.

I’ve been collecting vinyl for about 5 years now, and many ask me why. For me, and potentially many other collectors, purchasing records creates an experience for us.

I’ll set the scene: It’s Tuesday (the industry standard release day for music and other media). The latest record from one of my favorite artists has just been released, and I’m ecstatic to hear the new dynamics that the artist has explored in their most recent work. You’d think that my first action would be to find a digital version, either through iTunes, Amazon, or other digital music manufacturers, since this is the most efficient medium of hearing what I want to hear. For me, I’m thinking about when I can make it to my local record shop and pick up a copy.

Many would argue that this is wasted gas, wasted money on a dead medium, and overall, just worthless. Why would you want a vinyl copy when you can get the files at the click of a mouse? This is where the experiential side of things comes into play.

For me, buying a new record the day it is released is truly an experience.

You drive to your favorite local record shop (for me, UHF Records in Royal Oak!). You dig through the bins to find the new record, and once you find it, there’s a feeling of satisfaction no digital file can ever replicate.

You finish your transaction and anxiously await your return home to experience this new album. You get home, open the packaging, study the artwork and the design, and read through the production credits, lyric books, and any other included paperwork that may be included in the record. Then, you put the record on to hear for the first time.

There’s a special feeling you get when you listen to a brand new record. The full, warm quality of the analog transcription slowly grazed by a fresh needle. It’s a really special experience for music enthusiasts.

This is why vinyl records are still so special to so many people. Having a tangible, full canvas of a favorite record provides a sense of pride and joy that a digital file just can’t provide. This is why, I believe, vinyl records will stand the test of time.

Sure, you can get any album you want by means of digital download. Aside from nit-picky quality differences, the product of the album remains the same. It’s the experience of going to the record store, opening a new record, discovering it’s design and artwork, etc. that leads music enthusiasts to purchasing a physical copy of an album they love, as opposed to just having the files stored away on your computer.

This is a very clear example of experiential marketing. If vinyl records didn’t create the experience they do, everyone would be buying digital music. But the vinyl record industry is continuing to expand and evolve, and that shows how meaningful this medium of marketing a product can be, and how important experience truly is to the world of product marketing.

photo credit: IMG_5368 Speed tracker #vinyl #record #player #turntable via photopin (license)

Motion Graphics and Video Marketing – Sally Hogshead

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

By Lauren Primeau

34784144_4295f43c31Renowned keynote speaker Sally Hogshead, CEO of Fascinate Inc., tells audiences that we need people to fall in love with our ideas, and that one crucial way to do that is through the power of fascination. By captivating viewers, even for a few seconds, individuals, products or services make an indelible impression, permanently identifying and differentiating themselves.

When I first heard Sally speak about this idea, I was immediately hooked. I thought her simple insight was the master key to effective communication, and as a communications specialist myself, I wanted to see how I could apply her concept of fascination to my own medium, video production.

With more than two billion videos viewed per month on the Internet, the question naturally arises, “How do I get my video noticed?” Reviewing all the tools and techniques in my video production toolbox, I asked myself, “How can I fascinate, captivate, inform and touch the viewer? It must be creative, unexpected, visually arresting, evoke emotion and stimulate thought.” I quickly concluded that whatever images were in my video, they could be transformed from interesting to captivating through the use of computer-generated images, sometimes called CGI or motion graphics.

Going to Sally’s website, I quickly discovered that, indeed, her demo video employs motion graphics throughout, especially at the very beginning, where she lists the seven triggers of fascination. Rather than listing or discussing her seven triggers, the video’s motion graphics illustrate them, reinforcing her message, while simultaneously grabbing the viewer’s attention. In addition to their visual appeal, animated color graphics significantly improve the production values of her demo video, enhancing its quality and professionalism, a direct reflection on her own quality and professionalism as a keynote speaker.

There are several other advantages to incorporating motion graphics in a video, such as the ability to present information that might have not been possible through the use of video footage alone. For example, a simulation of hair growing from a balding scalp can be dramatically illustrated with 3D motion graphics much more effectively than before and after photos. In addition to modeling and animation, kinetic typography, animated text, is another powerful use of motion graphics that conveys information quickly.

In summary, the ability to captivate as well as entertain audiences is a crucial aspect of any successful video production. Motion graphics are an eye-catching tool that helps captivate audiences and conveys your message in a memorable way. Primeau Productions is pleased to offer the latest in custom, 2D and 3D motion graphics that will enhance any video.

photo credit: Fractal Color Animation29 via photopin (license)

What Primetime Television Can Teach Us About Content Marketing

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

By Brad Finegan

gamers-room-999218-mI remember watching television with my parents over a family dinner in 2013.  We were watching the evening news, eating my mother’s roast, when suddenly, I realized something; this was the first time in ages I had watched a broadcast television.

I was floored. Here I am, a media communications major, and I can’t remember the last time I watched a broadcast TV. For my parents, primetime TV is a more-than-weekly evening ritual. Television news, morning and evening, is a daily routine. I, on the other hand, don’t even have cable in my room. What was the difference? What did they see in television that I didn’t? Then, it hit me like a bag of bricks labeled “obvious.”

The Internet.

It wasn’t what I was missing, it was how our youth differed.  My parents come from a generation where television depended on you, the viewer, to free your schedule for it.  If you didn’t, the network would determine the show wasn’t making quota, and that it wasn’t worth keeping on the air.  These days, it’s an absolute blessing if someone actually watches your show when it actually airs on an actual television.

Now, this isn’t to insist that this transition is going to kill television.  Television is visual entertainment, and it’s still the case (maybe even more-so, now) that video connects to others unlike any other medium.  This is to insist that companies distributing content may want to take a step back and learn how we, the viewers, choose to ingest that content.

Generally speaking, if you ask anyone under age 25 how they view their favorite shows, chances are they’ll return the same answers. Hulu, their DVR, and most importantly; Netflix. Avenues such as these stand as new mediums of sharing content amongst a large crowd, and with changing times, there’s a chance that these could become a new standard.

Here’s an example. NBC’s “Community” is a primetime television show about a group of seven quirky community college students and their life-changing and hysterical adventures through their four years of school. The show retained a huge cult following; the issue was NBC couldn’t recognize it. Why? Because fans of the show are generally under age 25, and chances are they don’t even have cable to watch it on.

Ratings (based on viewership) started to slip. The show found itself on a Friday night slot (not great for a primetime schedule) and on the verge of cancellation after its third season. Once their fan base received word of this, they did practically everything they could to save the show. Netflix and Hulu viewing exponentially increased. More people were accessing the show via On Demand services and DVR. The hashtag campaign #sixseasonsandamovie, insisting that the show deserved to receive six seasons and a movie, went viral virtually overnight. These fans were so dedicated to keeping the show on the air, and did everything they could to do so, except the one thing that would actually raise ratings; watching the show on television when it actually aired.

As this was happening, ratings for “Community” were still hardly sub-par, but when the time came, the executives at NBC signed the show for a fourth season. The show is currently onto its fifth season and stronger than ever.

How can we relate this back to content marketing? Well, it shows us that one avenue isn’t always the only avenue. YouTube may be the second largest search engine in the world, but Instagram is the second largest social media site in the world. Why not put some of your video content there? Even though Facebook is the top social media site right now, who’s to say Google+ won’t get there?

Like with television, the future of content marketing is undetermined, more-so now than ever before. Every avenue could have potential to become a new standard. We now have the ability to ingest content from so many sources that no one could ever possibly be sure where the next viral trend will end up. As a business owner or content marketer, you should always keep the potential of “what-if” in mind. As the internet continues to grow exponentially, the avenues we have access to taking are endless, and we shouldn’t squander the possibility of new avenues taking over our respective markets.

 

 

Going Viral Is Good Business

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

6277208304_ab6988a99fBig-budget Hollywood director Michael Bay (Transformers, Armageddon, The Rock) had an onstage meltdown last week at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. He was there promoting the electronics giant Samsung and its new 105-inch curved UHD television. It started off OK, but then the teleprompter went down, leaving Bay at a loss for words. Suddenly incapable of putting together an English sentence, the
A-list director muttered, “Excuse me, I’m sorry …,” turned and walked off stage. The video of the live event quickly went viral, surpassing one million YouTube views.

Now, I’ve met a few successful movie directors, and they all impressed me as outstanding, natural communicators. Directors do nothing all day but communicate – with writers, studio execs, actors, department heads and ultimately, audiences. That’s one of the reasons I suspect that Bay’s gaffe was more stratagem than stage fright. As he watched Bay flounder, Samsung Executive Vice President, Joe Stinziano, pitched him a softball question, “The curve, how do you think it’s going to impact how viewers experience your movies?” It was this unanticipated query that finally drove Bay from the stage.

Picture this: it’s a few days before CES, and Samsung’s newly hired creative team is desperately searching for some way to get Samsung’s name and the fanfare accompanying its curved TV heard above the din of business-as-usual at the world’s largest, not open to the public, tradeshow. Someone in the room mentions “viral video,” but everyone present knows that’s a million-to-one shot. Then a young man in the corner blurts out, “Michael Bay is a big name – can’t we use him somehow?” With that, there is an explosion of ideas. Raising his arms, the senior most exec in the room announces, “We need something like a ‘wardrobe malfunction’ that will be sensational, look spontaneous and is easy enough for Michael to pull off.” Bay is contacted, and he loves the idea.

Following the show, it was confirmed as the largest ever, with 150,000 attendees, 35,000 of whom were from outside the U.S. “One-third of the world’s population interacted with CES in some way this week, as we experienced the future,” said Gary Shapiro, president of the Consumer Electronics Association. “From curved and flexible Ultra HD TVs and next-generation smartphones to drones, robots, sensors, the Internet of Everything, Hi-Res audio, connected cars and 3D printers, it seems like the only thing missing from the 2014 CES was a time-travel machine,” Shapiro said.

I think you’re starting to get the idea. Corporate America knows that the least expensive and most effective communications tool now available is the viral video, and I’m predicting an uptick in the number of celebrities having some telegenic mishap in the vicinity of the product they are promoting. Remember the truism, “There’s no such thing as bad publicity.”

How did things work out for Samsung and Michael Bay? Sunday night’s Golden Globe Awards (21 million U.S. viewers) had host Tina Fey doing her wildly funny impersonation of Michael Bay, as she stumbled, coughed, and finally gave up on an introduction of presenters Chris Evans and Uma Thurman. Its 105-inch TV (price still not announced) got coverage from CNN, Bloomberg and all the network news programs. The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, and hundreds of other newspapers worldwide carried stories. By all accounts, it was the hit of the show. And coincidentally, the new Michael Bay-produced pirate series, Black Sails, debuts this Saturday on YouTube (a week before it airs on Starz).

What do you think? You can watch Michael Bay’s CES 2014 meltdown below:

photo credit: Newspapers B&W (2) via photopin (license)

YouTube Monetization – Is It Really Worth It?

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

FullSizeRenderMonetization is a questionable subject.  What sounds so bad about allowing YouTube to advertise on your videos? Monetization makes you money, gives you higher credibility with YouTube, and overall could make your channel look more credible to users.  That all sounds great! However, there are potential downsides to monetization you should be aware of before making a decision.

Though monetization could make you some extra side money, this profit is nowhere near the amount of money that could be made from voiding monetization. Think about it like this: let’s say you’ve opened a small software company that has created a new type of photo editing software. You’ve established a following of users online by creating an explainer video about the software, and YouTube offers monetization for your channel. Great! You can make some extra money on the side while still promoting your brand! Well, let’s say once you allow monetization, Adobe runs a new ad campaign for the newest edition of Photoshop/Creative Cloud.  If a user clicks on your explainer video, and the first thing they see is an advertisement for a new edition of Photoshop, this will only distract the user from hearing about your software, and potentially drive them to just pick up Photoshop.  That click to Adobe’s site does make you a small amount of money, but not nearly as much money as if the user had purchased your software. This ad is only taking away from attracting people to your brand.

Now, just because ads can be distracting doesn’t mean monetization should be completely ignored. Monetization establishes authority with YouTube for your brand and puts you as close to partner status as a channel can get. This is something you can take advantage of. Remember that video you put on your channel with good intentions, but it never received the traffic you expected it to? Use these videos as your monetized videos.  This way, the important videos on your channel will not lose focus, but YouTube will still know that you are interested in the authority that comes with monetization.

Aside from these, you have to think of the user.  When a user is looking for a piece of content quickly from your channel, and a mandatory 30 second ad spot plays before your video, that user will seek other arrangements to find the content.  With the increasing speed of technology and social media, typical users don’t have the patience or attention span to deal with waiting through an ad like that. Users want instant gratification, as many sources amongst the internet can provide that gratification. Making users sit through these ads could cause them to associate your channel with this impatience, causing them not to come back. You want to provide users with your branded content as efficiently and effectively as possible.

So where is the money really? Are the cents you make per ad click really worth more than potential leads? Monetization can be effective for authority, but ultimately, establishing your brand is the most important part of creating an online following, which could subsequently gain your company leads.

This blog post was inspired by a video created by James Wedmore entitled “Youtube Monetization – Yes or No.” You can find that video here and subscribe to his channel here.

You can learn how to create a call to action ad here.

How to Gain the Most From Your Next Video Marketing Campaign

Monday, August 5th, 2013

by: Donna Essex

5202413219_43279a9656Boost Business with Video

The world of corporate videos has evolved considerably since the days of simply sending out DVDs and VHS tapes to hopefully interested parties, and today the videos that you produce to boost your profile can be uploaded to a global audience within seconds. People are spending more and more of their online time watching video, which means that it’s not enough to simply rely on text and photos. However, if you don’t have the time, resources or know-how to produce a
corporate video in-house, it’s a good idea to enlist the services of a corporate video production company.

The Power of Corporate Video Production 

The more engaging, entertaining and informative a corporate video is, the better. The more watchable it is, the greater the chances are of it being shared on social networking sites and linked to on reputable external websites, sending your brand soaring up the search engine rankings in the process. Websites that have video featured on them tend to be looked upon extremely favourably by the search engine giants, and by getting help from an outside source with corporate video production, you can ensure that your videos become as entertaining and useful as possible due to their experience in the trade.

Working with You

A video production company will generally work closely alongside you in detail to discuss your brand identity and values. This ensures that the resulting video is a close portrayal of the image that you wish to portray and that it speaks with your target audience in mind. Web users don’t need to be in front of their laptops anymore to enjoy your video content, and can easily engage with your clips whilst they are out and about, making it easier to engage with them no matter where they are in the world. Involving your staff in corporate video production can also help with employee engagement, allowing them to feel part of something useful, prosperous and exciting – and if they feature in it, this can help you to show off the ‘human’ side of your brand to potential customers and clients.

Find a Video Production Company

Mobile video has reshaped the way that we use the internet, and faster mobile download speeds are starting to make it possible for us to enjoy moving pictures without the stress of dealing with buffering and other technical problems. YouTube is the world’s second leading search engine after Google, so it makes sense to note just how effective video marketing can be. Any company that is failing to make use of video marketing may be risking being left behind by its competitors, so if your company is yet to take advantage of this exceptional marketing tool, it might be a wise idea to invest in video today. Video is also searchable, and is starting to appear more and more prominently in organic search results. A unique and memorable video can be worth its weight in gold when it comes to generating conversions and strengthening engagement.

photo credit: IMG_8072 via photopin (license)

Professional Speaker Tool Kit

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

14995291959_c4991b67e6In the old days, having a great assistant and professionally produced speaker demo video was all you need to make it as a keynote professional speaker. This is not so any longer. The speaking industry is much more competitive today and professional speakers often sacrifice their principles just to get a gig which tarnishes the image of the industry as a whole.

Running a professional speaking business today requires several tools in order to ”make it” on the speaking circuit. Successful keynote professional speakers keep this tool kit available to them at all times. The tool kit is not easy when the aspiring speaker begins their journey but with the right attitude and perseverance the professional speaker tool kit will come together.

The first tool in the kit is a powerful message. Professional speaker and client of Primeau Productions Connie Podesta always had a powerful message and constantly uses that message in her branding and Internet marketing. Today her message is ”Stand Out from the Crowd,” which is also the title of her latest book, which was a Gold Medal winner in the 2011 Independent Publisher Book Awards!

The second tool in the tool kit to help you make it as a keynote professional speaker is charisma, which means compelling attractiveness or charm that can inspire devotion in others; a divinely conferred power or talent! Some professional speakers make it in the business without charisma because their message is powerful. The professional speakers that make it into the top 20 best speakers on the circuit have charisma.

The third tool in the professional speaker tool kit is an excellent marketing campaign. This campaign consists of several ingredients:

  • A professional produced speaker demo video
  • Professional looking and easy to navigate website
  • Word of mouth referrals
  • Social media strategy using all social media accounts
  • A content rich blog
  • A fair speaking fee and travel expenses
  • Good relationship with speaker bureaus

The fourth tool in the kit is appearance. In order to command the type of fee a great keynote professional speaker earns, you have to look great on the platform. If you do not have the ability to choose clothing that compliments your appearance then find someone than can help. The rest of your appearance almost goes without saying. Your smile, demeanor, hair, nails and casual conversation off the platform all contribute to your appearance. Your appearance is your perceived value. This appearance must also come across in your professional speaker demo video.

The fifth tool is a pleasant personality. I have worked with some professional speakers that have a speech that is so much different than their casual conversation, it’s scary! All of the great professional speakers can carry on a great dinner conversation. They have the ability to carry on a engaging conversation with a pleasant personality before and after their presentation. This personality always shows even in difficult situations.

One of the greatest professional speakers of all time, Floyd Wickman, has an amazing ability to use words to his advantage in any situation. Not only is Floyd amazing on the platform, he is fun and captivating to talk to before and after the presentation.

I would like to hear your comments on what you believe are tools that professional speakers should use in their professional speaker tool kit.  You can post a comment below, email us at Primeau@PrimeauProductions.com or call 800-647-4281.  This business of speaking professionally has been through a major reinvention and there are many tools available for you to make it to the top.
photo credit: 08082014 – AD – Bus Tour – Washington HS 237 via photopin (license)

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