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Archive for February, 2012

Part 3: You As the Location Scout and More: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou can take cues from the Hollywood Pros to create better video for your business. Thinking like a Hollywood director is one way to increase your SEO, win clients, and set yourself apart from the competition. The following tips were written by Laurie Brown.

You as the Location Scout
Once scriptwriters, producers or directors have decided what general kind of scenery they require for the various parts of their work shot outside of the studio, the search for a suitable place or “location” outside the studio begins.

What this means to you is that you need to find the perfect location(s) for your video. Your background will add to the brand image of you, your product and services.

● What location(s) can you use?
● Is it noisy?
● Is there natural light?
● What else is in the shot?
● Do you need to get permission?

You as the Prop Master
During pre-production Property Masters liaise with production designers and art directors to break down the script and to determine what props are required. At this stage Property Masters may work with production buyers who carry out research into period props, styles of furniture, etc., by referring to archives, internet files, books and photographs, or by discussing the requirements with specialized advisors. Property Masters subsequently draw up complete properties lists, and set up and label the properties tables, which are used during production. From the lists, Property Masters select which properties are to be bought in, or hired, and which are to be made.

● Will you use any props?
● What props are essential?

You as the Set Dresser
The set decorator is in charge of the decorating of a film set, which includes the furnishings and all the other objects that will be seen in the film. They work closely with the production designer and coordinates with the art director

You as the Actor
A movie actor portrays different characters in films. His role may require him to be humorous, serious or a combination of the two. His ability to play a wide range of parts generally increases his success in the industry. The roles he plays may be large or small, shot in a studio or require him to travel to remote locations.

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her atLauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

Part 2: You as the Script Writer: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

Friday, February 24th, 2012

9165096158_a898527c5b_nYou as the Script Writer

The script writer develops a story idea with believable, interesting characters and lays out the plan on paper for the production team.

In this initial phase the writer fixates on a compelling idea and begins the “What if…” game. Characters are developed with back stories to flesh them out, and the idea grows into a causal storyline with a beginning, middle and end that includes the major plot points of each act. At the end of this process the screenwriter should know each character as well as a best friend, able to quickly predict how the character would react in any situation. The genre and theme should be clear, the story, solid.

Create the video in your mind’s eye first then commit it to paper in a story board style for easy communication to your production team. Write out the wording or copy points even if not perfect so everyone understands your vision.

What this means to you is that you have to come up with the script for your video before you begin the production process.  Spend some time before you begin jotting down ideas.  It’s amazing how putting pen to paper helps the creative process.

Make a list of the topics you can write a script about; what are you a subject matter expert on? How does your talent, skills and ability translate to a valuable script idea and video?

Remember that you can make revisions to your script so you don’t have to be perfect on the first draft.  Show your script to a mentor or employee and get their opinion and feedback.  Two heads are better than one.

  • You need to write a script
  • Who is your audience?
  • What do they need to know about your topic?
  • How will you format your message?
  • Make a list of topics to elaborate on
  • You can always revise your script before recording any video

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her atLauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

photo credit: Cracking Animation via photopin (license)

Part 1: You as the Producer: How the Hollywood Pros Can Help

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

Calgary Corporate Video Production CompanyYou as the Producer

A movie producer oversees all aspects of the movie production and delivers a film project to all relevant parties while preserving the integrity, voice and vision of the film. They will also often take on some financial risk by using their own money and investing more time than being compensated for, especially before a film is fully financed  during the pre-production period.

The producer is often actively involved throughout all major phases of the film-making process, from inception and development through to completion and delivery of a film project.

What this means to you is that you have to learn how to think like a producer when creating video content for your business.  Who do you need to be on your video production team? Your employees know your business better than anyone else so utilize their talent, skill and ability. Keep in mind what your prospects and customers need to know about your business, products and services.

Create a budget for your equipment purchase or professional assistance as well as your investment of time and stick to it.  Create databases for your production team that include contact information of professional service suppliers, equipment vendors and other resources for easy access.

As you build your Internet marketing campaign, you will also need a database of all your contacts, prospects and social media account sign in information, including passwords.

You are the boss of your video production and as the producer you have to be the architect of your video from beginning to end.

  • Learn how to think like a producer
  • Who will be on your production team?
  • Create a budget
  • Manage your database of contacts, prospects and social media outlets

From “Blockbuster Business Videos: What The Hollywood Pro’s Want You to Know About Creating Video That Will Increase Your SEO, Win Clients and Set You Apart From Your Competition,” by Ed Primeau and Laurie Brown. Laurie Brown helps individuals present themselves effectively in person and virtually through the camera lens. You can reach her atLauriebrown@thedifference.net or visit http://www.thedifference.net

Learn How to Say No – Stress Free Living

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

IMG_6830Stress free living: it may be hard at first, but with time your guilt will diminish.

One of the biggest problems we are all faced with every week is saying yes when we really want to say no. Saying yes when we really want to say no causes unnecessary stress.

In business, we say yes to our clients in order to make them happy and provide great service.  Many of those yes’s should have been no’s and we would have served our clients better.

In our personal lives, we say yes when we really should say no to avoid guilt. Last week a friend asked me to help him design a website and marketing campaign for his bar in Detroit Michigan. I said yes because he is a great friend and truly needed our expertise. That yes will turn into work for us because he has a very historic high profile business in the heart of downtown Detroit.  That yes will be stress free because we can take our time with the activity and complete the project on our terms.

Often when people ask us to go out of our way they are thinking of themselves and not those they ask for help. If we all learned to say no at least some of the time, we would have less stress in our lives.

By saying yes too often, we add activity to our already busy lives. Think about the last time you reluctantly said yes and really wanted to say no. How much time would you have back in your life if you would have said no?

Saying yes when we really want to say no is very stressful. It’s not that people want to stress us out, but rather that so many need our help.  One of the greatest character traits of a leader is to delegate. When people ask for our help they are really trying to delegate some of their activity to us. The secret to living a happier and healthier life is to learn to say no more often. Think about the number of hours we could all get back into our lives if we said no just some of the time.

Next time somebody asks you to help them and you don’t want to, think of the language you can use to say no. Try these lines:

“I would really like to help you, but I am out of time this week.”

“If you saw my schedule this week you would know what I have to decline your request.”

How about this: “No.”

You do not have to be mean saying no. Keep your eye on the prize: the ability to keep your stress level down and have more time back in your life.

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